Celebrating 25 years https://royalsaskmuseum.ca/rsm/education/blog/celebrating-25-years Throughout June we celebrated National Indigenous History Month. With events centered around weekly themes including Film Week, Treaties Week, and Tools and Technology Week, they led up to the month’s major event, the celebration of the 25th anniversary of the Royal Saskatchewan Museum’s First Nation’s Gallery – a groundbreaking achievement at the... Nothing Is As Constant As Change https://royalsaskmuseum.ca/rsm/education/blog/nothing-is-as-constant-as-change "Nothing is as constant as change."– Miss. Frizzle, "The Magic School Bus" (Season 1, episode 11), paraphrasing Heraclitus of EphesusThis seemingly simple concept is amazingly suitable for describing nature. From my vantage point at the T.rex Discovery Centre, I can watch as nature changes around me: from the passage of a storm, to visits from wildlife, to the march... Dinosaurs Are Not for Boys https://royalsaskmuseum.ca/rsm/education/blog/dinosaurs-are-not-for-boys I had my first encounter with a dinosaur in the same place most people do: in a museum. The dinosaur in question was a sauropod (long-necked dinosaur) called Mamenchisaurus. It was a Chinese dinosaur on display at a museum in Cardiff, Wales, where we were living at the time.I decided there and then that I was going to be a palaeontologist when I grew up.I had just turned four.My grade three art... Where Were the Women? https://royalsaskmuseum.ca/rsm/education/blog/where-were-the-women Many treaties have been negotiated throughout Turtle Island since the time of Contact. In the lands now known as Canada, numerous treaties have been signed, with the post-Confederation treaties covering some of the largest areas of the provinces and territories. In Saskatchewan, portions of Treaties 2, 4, 5, 6, 8  and 10 are found within its boundaries, all negotiated after 1867. For Regina,... BioBlitz Canada 150: What We Found https://royalsaskmuseum.ca/rsm/education/blog/bioblitz-summary To mark Canada's 150th anniversary, we joined the country in exploring the biodiversity around us with a 24-hour bioblitz in June (BioBlitz Canada 150: Regina) and July (BioBlitzing the Cypress Hills). The records from both these BioBlitzes will be rolled into the BioBlitz Canada 150 data to help inform choices on such issues such as climate change and loss of biodiversity, shape conservation... What dinosaur species do we have in Saskatchewan? https://royalsaskmuseum.ca/rsm/education/blog/dinosaur-species-in-saskatchewan First things first, dinosaurs are a diverse group of terrestrial reptiles from the Mesozoic Era. Extinct reptiles like mosasaurus and pterodactyls which lived alongside the dinosaurs, are marine reptiles and flying reptiles, respectively, not dinosaurs themselves.Now, back to dinosaurs. Saskatchewan is home to dinosaur fossils from two geological time periods of the Late CretaceousThe older... Minton Turtle Effigy https://royalsaskmuseum.ca/rsm/education/blog/minton-turtle-effigy There are many boulder monuments across Saskatchewan, one of the most notable is the Minton Turtle Effigy. When it was first identified in 1965 by Thomas Kehoe, it was presumed that the Minton Effigy represented a turtle. However, since then, people have noted differences between the Minton Effigy and other turtle effigies in Saskatchewan.One of the first things to study on this effigy is the... What can leaves tell us about climate? https://royalsaskmuseum.ca/rsm/education/blog/climate-affects-leaf-shape The size and shape of leaves, what botanists call ‘leaf architecture’, is highly correlated with temperature, precipitation and seasonality. Angiosperms (flowering plants) have always been faced with a trade-off: how to balance the effectiveness of photosynthesis while reducing water loss from evapotranspiration. Photosynthesis, the process by which plants process energy for... How does an archaeologist know when to stop digging? https://royalsaskmuseum.ca/rsm/education/blog/when-to-stop-digging West Wall profile at the Gull Lake Site (EaOd-1), a bison drive and kill site in the Missouri Coteau. The site was excavated from 1960-1963, without bracing, which is highly not recommended.This is becoming a very important question in North and South America. Soil scientists have identified how sediments deposit and age through time. Horizons (identified as the “A”, “B”... Why is the K-Pg Boundary so clearly identifiable in certain parts of Saskatchewan? https://royalsaskmuseum.ca/rsm/education/blog/k-pg-boundary The Cretaceous-Paleogene, or K-Pg, Boundary is a line that definitively marks the end-Cretaceous mass extinction everywhere in the world where the right aged rocks are preserved. The boundary layer itself is made up a fine clay that is rich in a mineral called iridium. Iridium is not found on the Earth’s surface, so whenever it is present in the rock record, scientists know it came from...